Interviews

Catherine Lacey Gets Back to Work

Catherine Lacey never intended to write a novel. Her first book, Nobody Is Ever Missing, began as a series of disconnected stories she wrote while tinkering with a freelance non-fiction career. Eventually her spurts of fiction gelled…

Put It in the Pot: An Interview with Adam Wilson

Adam Wilson is the author of the anti-coming-of-age novel Flatscreen (2012) and a new short story collection, What’s Important Is Feeling. He writes beautifully about ugly stuff: addictions, afflictions, moral failures. His characters are often adolescent…

Adam Berg: Rocks, Clocks, and the iPhone

I first met Adam Berg (a Trop contributor) as a student in his Perspectives in Modern Philosophy class at CalArts. I was intrigued but not surprised to learn of his prolific visual art practice. His current…

Aisha Sabatini Sloan

In The Fluency of Light, Aisha Sabatini Sloan’s essays read like meditations on themes of identity, race, and family. Her writing is sharp—one might say spare—and her descriptions, clear and beautiful. Her essays are a guide…

Jonathan Callahan

Behold: a vision, a prize—“a black unicorn with golden hooves, a tail like splayed fire, horn a glinting spear, eyes like emeralds, seraphic wings.” Beware: the voracious solar bear, which “subsists primarily on sunlight, drawing supplementary…

Julie Sarkissian

Julie Sarkissian’s debut novel, Dear Lucy, tells the story of Lucy, a girl with evident but unspecified special needs who has been sent to live on a farm with Mister and Misses, a married couple with…

Audrey Bilger

Audrey Bilger is one of the key voices to follow on marriage equality. She’s written with razor-sharp expertise and more than a pinch of humor about LGBTQ rights, gender norms, the lesbian word “wife,” and why…